“Master Regulator” Gene — Long Tied to Autism Disorders — Can Stimulate Other Genes Involved in Early Brain Development

Chemical modifications to DNA’s packaging—known as epigenetic changes—can activate or repress genes involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and early brain development, according to a new study led by Danny Reinberg, PhD that was published in the journal Nature. Biochemists from NYU Langone Medical Center found that these epigenetic changes in mice and laboratory experiments remove the blocking mechanism of a protein complex long known for gene suppression, and transitions the complex to a gene activating role instead. Read more...


New Technology Advances Eye Tracking as Biomarker for Brain Function and Recovery from Brain Injury

NYULMC researchers have developed new technology that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes, according to a study published on-line in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The study suggests that the use of eye tracking technology may be a potential biological marker for assessing brain function and monitoring recovery for patients with brain injuries. Led by Uzma Samadani, MD, PhD, chief of neurosurgery at New York Harbor Health Care System and co-director of the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Veterans Center for the Study of Post-Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury at NYULMC, the study looked at 169 veterans. Read more…