Novel Eye-Tracking Technology Detects Concussions and Head Injury Severity

Neuroscientists and concussion experts from NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, in a study published online in Journal of Neurotrauma, present a unique, simple and objective diagnostic tool for concussion that can be utilized in the emergency room or, one day, on the sidelines at sporting events. The study, led by Uzma Samadani, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Departments of Neurosurgery, Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Physiology, utilized a novel eye-tracking device to effectively measure the severity of concussion or brain injury in patients presenting to emergency departments following head trauma. Read more...


A Paradox Revealed: Cues Associated with Infant Abuse May Help Reduce Stress in the Adult Brain

NYULMC neurobiologists and other institutions have found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully-grown. Senior study investigator Regina Sullivan, PhD and graduate student MillieRincón-Cortés, PhD, in a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) online Jan. 5, say these results are surprising because cues associated with trauma experienced as adults provoke fear and do not rescue depressive behavior. Read more…